1992 Dodge Imperial Concept

View previous topic View next topic Go down

1992 Dodge Imperial Concept

Post by ShelbyDodgeImp on April 30th 2009, 12:45 am

I posted a small bit on the 3rd thread on moparts, before I found this place.



My car is well, I am not sure what to call it anymore to be honest. It's a 1992 Dodge Dynasty body, with the standard 3.3L V6, but that's about the only thing on it that isn't modified right now... and I have an engine I need to pull and tweak before dropping in it. In the parkinglot is a wrecked 2000 model year Caravan, I'm getting its 3.3, and between that, my ported intake manifolds, 58mm tb, and 2.5" exhaust system, it should be half way decent for a daily driver. I'm actually already running a racing spec a604, has literally every modification there is done to it short of a custom TCM. Kevlar clutches, high stall TC, LSD, 2.0 stratus 41TE final drive gears- the works.

Interior is the stock Dynasty interior, in red, mark cross leather seats out of a 1988 NYer, 1988 NYer digital cluster, 1994 AA body LeBaron digital overhead console, custom polished aluminum center console, and a mixture of NYer, 5th Ave, and Imperial interior trim parts.

Body, well, the body is where it gets interesting. Most the trim has been removed from the body (i.e. wheel well trim, door trim, windshield trim), front end has been replaced with a front end off of a 90's Chrysler imperial (bumper shocks, bumper, nose, headlights), Imperial front fender blinkers & trim, 1993 New Yorker hood, functional cowl induction hoodscoop (largest allowed under NH's crazy OCD-like vehicle regulations) . But that didn't exactly leave me satisfied, so being a perfectionist I removed the upper Imperial grill trim (its a horizontal V-shaped chrome piece that the hood ordainment sets on), extended the fiberglass nose forward over the grill opening, cut the grill down so it's smaller, hard mounted the grill to the header panel using my own aluminum brackets, stripped & painted the chrome bumper... removed the folding headlight door assemblies, and then used fiberglass sheet to make the headlight openings into cleaned up headlight buckets.















I felt kinda funny trying my own paint. Fiberglass fabrication, now that's fun but I don't know anything about paint and wasn't sure I liked the idea of going cheap on the paint when, well, the trans alone cost me over 3 grand to have built (about 1.2 grand of that just being the trans performance parts!).

I wasn't going to do a custom paintjob, but the clearcoat started peeling off in sheets (mostly on the trunklid & roof), and the spots where it had came up seemed to start to rust (odd since the color coat and primer never peeled, no bare metal ever showed). So I wanted to do a flat-ish black and tried rattle cans, had nothing but problems with them flashing dry too fast. I tried rustoleum flat black, but rattle canning it just looked terrible because it would dry before it could self level. I eventually decided to try just black primer, but it would simply fade to gray primer, wasn't water proof, wasn't UV resistant... and only made the car want to rust faster (did I mention this is a daily driver?).

I had heard of the roller method, from back when the 1st of the three epic threads started on moparts, but never took the time to read them, finally this spring I said "I need to do SOMETHING!", read the 1st thread, some of the 2nd thread- and decided to give it a try.

I've been using satin black rustoleum, ordorless mineral spirits, 4-semi-smooth rollers (NOT ultra smooth), and satin black rattle cans (actually only needed 1/8th of one) for odd surfaces like the side mirrors.

My first coat scared me, bad. I started with a 50/50 mix and either it would run, or it would create the worst orange peel I've ever seen! Now I do a lot of woodworking,I am familiar with lacquer pants, getting smooth finishes without much in the way of sanding- so I knew I was doing something wrong- what I finally found was that I had to keep rolling a given area when using it that thin, to keep the runs from forming. Then once the paint started to "set", it would stay like that and by the time it fully dries, would be fairly smooth. Nonetheless, no matter how or where I did the 1st coat, the first coat would look down right disgusting!



The finish wouldn't look half way decent until I had no less than 3 coats on the car (not counting rockers or quarter panels, those are getting repaired before I worry about painting them). The whole car was already prepped with hi-fill black primer, body 100% straight except for 1 ding in the hood, 1 door has a dent (a garage jumped out in front of me, I tried to avoid it... but clipped it by mistake), and then the rust repairs are yet to commence on the rockers, rear wheel wells, and rear quarters. I don't plan to bondo the door, that's just going to get replaced the next time I get to a upullit. They're cheap enough and easy to find that it's stupid to try to bondo up an easily replaceable part that bolts on/off.



1st complete coat all the way around, 3rd coat on the front hood/fenders/nose:





Now like flat paints, I cannot say I've had any success in sanding satin black, wet sanding the final coat I truly believe would be a mistake (flat and satin paints are supposed to be textured, if you wet sand them it kills the texture). So all I am doing between coats is sanding off runs with 300-400 grit paper.



2nd coat all the way around (4th on the front hood/fenders/nose):










3rd coat all the way around (5th on the front hood/fenders/nose), Note shown when wet and not fully dry (so it looks splotchy):








For half way done, I am impressed, I've used 2.2 quarts so far (in my 3rd can), its drying fairly smooth, and it looks like a pro gun-done job from 10ft, from close up you can see some low areas here and there yet that I need to go over, my plan is to get all the low spots fixed with more coats, then focus on one section at a time to deliver the final coat. Idea is that the final coat, provided there are no runs, will be left as-is, no wet sanding- just mild polishing and waxing. If any section (i.e. the trunklid) gets a run, I have to sand off the run and try again- since there is no margin of error with satin black. Any even tiny run or low spot sticks out like a sore thumb!

Despite using a textured roller, no wet sanding, and nothing beyond spot removal of runs between coats, close up is comparable to my friend's satin black car, and his IS professionally done- BC only (no CC).

Here's a close up on his, you'll see the orange peel on a "pro" satin black:



Ok, so his car is not a high dollar Boyd creation or anything like that, but it isn't a beat on daily driver by a long shot, and for all of $40 I've gotten something directly comparable finish-wise. I know from looking at his car that they did at least 4 coats, complete prep w/ body filler to get the body lines straight, which on a car that size- isn't cheap. If I took his car to a body shop and say "duplicate this" I'd be lucky to be out 2 grand.

I'm lucky in that, outside the areas already described- I don't have to mess with body filler.


So if this will work this well, without doing much between coats, with an unforgiving satin black, that says a lot for this process. The roller method is FAR under appreciated. The only downside I've found, besides being scared by the horrible way the 1st coat looked, was that everyone who saw me do it thought I was a whitetrash idiot. I had no less than 3 people pass me and start laughing at me, but for $40... I think I got the last laugh in the end. That's not even the cost of two tanks of gas!

If you let the car bake in the sun, this stuff dries HARD. I have rattle canned cars before with gloss rustoleum black, and it held up for years. If thinned out of the can stuff is anything like that, these cars should be good and vibrant for a decent amount of time.... probably longer than my factory paintjob lasted (9 years in my case). I kept the original factory primer on the car, it would be hard to duplicate the dip-tank primer they used in making the car. Anything short of good epoxy primer would probably not withstand as much in the way of road salt.

Questions:

1- Has anyone used this method over sheet metal with surface rust? Was the process any different? Did the rust continue to grow under or through the paint? My rockers won't need a ton of welding if I can just "paint over" the surface spots (provided I do some minor grinding first). Obviously anywhere its rusted threw is getting cut out and patched with welds, but some spots aren't rusted through yet.

2- Has anyone welded on a large body panel that had this paint on it? How far away from the weld point did the paint distort/bouble/whatever?

3- Any thoughts on undercoating for rockers/floorboards? My car WAS rust free until I trusted POR-15, now I have all kinds of rust spots to fix (only on spots I painted with POR15, I shoulda left the rust-free body stock down there!). Is the consensus to leave the rustoleum on undercarraige parts as-is or should it be top coated?
avatar
ShelbyDodgeImp
Rank
Rank

Number of posts : 10
Age : 32
Location : PA & NH
Job/hobbies : Perpetual Student
Project : 1992 Dodge Imperial Concept
Registration date : 2009-04-29

View user profile http://www.cardomain.com/ride/3072884

Back to top Go down

Re: 1992 Dodge Imperial Concept

Post by microshift on April 30th 2009, 9:37 am

Hey

Nice project!! Car looks like a Limo, a real classic, like we call it over here. I like it Smile

The moparts thread is epic, so much information!! But not so well organized as here Wink

Thanks for letting us know your rolling techniques!

As for the questions, I don't know 2 and 3 but for the 1, as far as I know, If you can cover rust very well as no more oxygen can access the rust or metal. The process of rusting will stop, because it needs oxygen to reacts with metal. That's what I think, but there is people here that knows these subjects far more that I.

Keep up the good work Very Happy
avatar
microshift
Rank
Rank

Number of posts : 18
Age : 39
Location : Portugal!!
Job/hobbies : Learning stuff :)
Registration date : 2009-04-20

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: 1992 Dodge Imperial Concept

Post by ShelbyDodgeImp on April 30th 2009, 3:06 pm

I wouldn't call it a classic yet, it's only 17 years old. In the US things usually have to wait until 20 or 25 years old to begin to fall under those collector classifications.
avatar
ShelbyDodgeImp
Rank
Rank

Number of posts : 10
Age : 32
Location : PA & NH
Job/hobbies : Perpetual Student
Project : 1992 Dodge Imperial Concept
Registration date : 2009-04-29

View user profile http://www.cardomain.com/ride/3072884

Back to top Go down

Re: 1992 Dodge Imperial Concept

Post by microshift on May 1st 2009, 5:28 pm

I mean classic style, bit old sedans. Here classic style are Mercedes Benz. Volvo look more alike your Dodge Imp. sharp corners and rear window almost vertical. But Volvo is not so common to see. What we see the most are Mercedes benz which are not yet classics in the terms of reefer but they still classics in some way. Unfortunately we don't see a single of these cars well treated because a paint job costs more than the car itself so, as a result, we don't have a chance to see a beautiful "specimen" just because people don't want to spend lots of money on the paint job. So, that's were your project is good, and this Rolled On way to paint, comes to save the day: We can have well done paint jobs economical viable and still have money in the pocket for gas and cruise those beautiful machines of othertimes. applaude
avatar
microshift
Rank
Rank

Number of posts : 18
Age : 39
Location : Portugal!!
Job/hobbies : Learning stuff :)
Registration date : 2009-04-20

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: 1992 Dodge Imperial Concept

Post by ShelbyDodgeImp on September 4th 2009, 6:16 pm

Here we have some "almost finished" pictures. Once the remaining rust repairs (rockers & quarter panels) are complete I can get the car to look consistent, otherwise- this is what it looks like cleaned & waxed right now!

So far I have about $50 invested into the paintjob, it might take another $20 to finish it. Not a lick of wet sanding, grinding, or polishing since this is supposed to ve a velvet TEXTURE (not smooth!). I simply lay a coat down, carefully, wait for it to dry... and hope I don't get any runs. If I get runs I sand it down smooth and redo the whole thing until its done right!











So here's what I've learned; if you're patient, a satin texture is entirely plausible using this method! Its probably harder, and you'll learn all kinds of new nasty words whenever you accidentally get a run, but it CAN be done.

I have to figure out how I want to remove the random bug that got stuck in the paint yet, but that's a finite detail.
avatar
ShelbyDodgeImp
Rank
Rank

Number of posts : 10
Age : 32
Location : PA & NH
Job/hobbies : Perpetual Student
Project : 1992 Dodge Imperial Concept
Registration date : 2009-04-29

View user profile http://www.cardomain.com/ride/3072884

Back to top Go down

Re: 1992 Dodge Imperial Concept

Post by JohnnyV on April 5th 2010, 10:57 am

I have to say that this is a cool project. I always liked the Dodge Dynasty but I think your take on this is really creative. Cool!!
avatar
JohnnyV
Rank
Rank

Number of posts : 64
Age : 34
Location : Anderson, IN
Project : 98 Dodge Dakota Sport
Registration date : 2010-03-26

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: 1992 Dodge Imperial Concept

Post by Sponsored content


Sponsored content


Back to top Go down

View previous topic View next topic Back to top

- Similar topics

 
Permissions in this forum:
You cannot reply to topics in this forum