When to quit.

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When to quit.

Post by peeeot on December 2nd 2010, 5:46 pm

I can see that this topic has been addressed to some degree, but I'm not getting quite the info I'm looking for.

I am trying to determine how far to take the 600 grit wet sanding in between coats. I should note that I have been following the model for technique described here: http://www.hotrod.com/techarticles/body/hrdp_0707_1962_ford_falcon_budget_paint_job/photo_01.html Accordingly, I have applied two coats at a minimum 24-hr interval and wet sanded with 600 grit paper before applying additional paint.

Naturally, to get the paint to lay as smooth as possible, I must sand out all of the little shiny spots in the dried paint. The trouble is, the paint always has some degree of orange peel. If I thin the paint more heavily, it lays down more smoothly, but the coverage is thinner, whereas a more paint-heavy mixture is more orange-peeled but with better coverage. Honestly I have not noticed much difference in the way the paint goes down and have not measured out the quantities of paint and thinner but have guesstimated, as did Hot Rod Magazine.

In either case, though, to get rid of all the shiny spots, I am practically taking the second coat of paint right back off again, and I always start to see some of the underlying color. It just seems as though I will never get adequate coverage at this rate. By the way, I started with original white paint, added two coats of Safety Red with improper technique(much too brief drying time between coats), then applied 2 coats Sunrise Red the same way, then hit it with 220 grit paper and a sander to get a uniform starting-over point, and since then a total of 4 properly-applied coats of Sunrise Red.

Since I started off with white, there are a few spots where too-thin coverage is especially evident, and they happen to be in the areas most likely to build texture.

So, how much wet sanding is enough between paint applications?
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Re: When to quit.

Post by DaveB on December 2nd 2010, 7:27 pm

This is just my opinion, I've done a couple and I'm getting better, but in no means am I an "expert".

I sand a little further when I"m into the higher coats. I always put it on thin so I ran into the same problem. You'll be happier putting it on thin with plenty of dry time, much better bonding.

So, I basically just rub it down after coats one and two.. just no "mountains".. then between 3 and 4 I try to sand a little better, but still not even close to sanding it flat, more like making sure its scuffed good for the next coat. By the end tho, I try a little harder to get it flatter and flatter, but I have more paint on by then, and having put it on thin, I don't have that really thick orange peel, so its not so bad.

One time when I was figuring this out I polished a test panel I practiced on... and I left it at varying stages of "shiny dots".. and honestly.. the better sanded the better it looked.. but you REALLY had to look to see some of the dots I left in the other stages of flattening.

Thats just my experience.. take it for what its worth.

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Re: When to quit.

Post by peeeot on December 4th 2010, 2:01 pm

By putting it on thin, are you talking about the paint-to-thinner ratio, or how heavily loaded the roller is as you apply the paint?

I like the sound of your technique because it sounds like less work Wink It makes sense, too, that the paint would fill in the low places to a limited degree as you go--that it would tend to pool in the dimples and roll off the mountains.

So, based on your experience, getting rid of all the shiny spots is really only important in the final sanding phase? Do you think that failing to sand more heavily in between prior coats results in more sanding at the final step?
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Re: When to quit.

Post by DaveB on December 4th 2010, 2:17 pm

Well if you have huge peel, you have to get it off. What I mean by thin is not to load the roller up.. I usually explain it by saying... "as close to 'dry rolling' as you can be.. but not quite dry rolling." I was thinking I was getting awesome coverage after a coat or two... and that should have been my sign (that and the hard to sand peel). I ended up machine sanding most of that off to start over with thinner coats.

Also I was always burning through on wet sand and it was makin me mad.. so I stop when I get it down to just a few bright spots. In order to see what this would do, I went back and polished on an S-10 hood I played with and even when there was this small level of dots it shined up extremely well. You really REALLY had to look close to see anything, and in fact even factory cars have peel if you look. Now, this was on red.. LOL I'm now doing black.. which is very unforgiving.. we'll see how my advice works after I get more paint on! lol

Good luck
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Re: When to quit.

Post by DaveB on December 4th 2010, 2:23 pm

Sorry to add more, I'm talky by nature.. lol Ask my friends.

I was looking at the Sticky of the forum founder, he did a yellow truck.
His write up and pics are perfect.
Yellow is a hard color to cover with anyways, but you can see in his pics after 3, 4, maybe even 5 coats that if you looked hard you could see some of his body work still. Again, yellow already hard to cover with, but thats how thin I think you should put it on to make it easier on yourself.

The guy with the yellow neon had some pretty bad peel going.. but in his finish pics the car looks fine.. so he either worked harder and got it flat, or just polished it.. either way.. it goes to show that you can get to the same place a lot of different ways.
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